Book Review: Forgotten (Catherine McKenzie)

To celebrate the paperback release of Catherine McKenzie’s Forgotten, I decided to finally buckle down and write a review on it because it definitely deserves one. I came across this book last summer as I was writing out a list of new releases and eventually it made it’s way onto my library list and into my hands. I knew that this was one book I absolutely HAD to read because the summary was ridiculously intriguing.BOOK2

Summary: The book stars Emma Tupper, a dedicated lawyer with big plans for her future. However, following the death of her mother, Emma decides to take a month-long sabbatical from the corporate universe and impulsively follows her heart to Africa. Everything in Emma’s life has always followed her plans, but what she couldn’t account for was the illness and devastating earthquake that leave her stranded in an African village for several months. Upon returning safe and sound, Emma has to come to terms with the fact that everyone she knew has moved on from her supposed “death”.  How is she supposed to get back everything she knew and loved – her job, her apartment, and her life – when everything has changed? While others view this as a chance for Emma to change, she struggles with trying to fit into a place where she once belonged. Forgotten explores the journey of figuring out who you really are and what you really want when you have absolutely nothing left.

Favourite Quote: It seemed like almost nothing had happened, but that almost nothing changed everything for me.

Review: This book was such a relief. I had been itching to read something real, something that hits it home in the emotions department, something that warrants deep, soul-searching thoughts. This was it. The characters in the book are all so likable that I felt as if I was being told a story by a friend. Emma is a strong character, even when Continue reading

Quote of the Day

“Perhaps all the dragons in our lives are princesses who are only waiting to see us act, just once, with beauty and courage. Perhaps everything that frightens us is, in its deepest essence, something helpless that wants our love.”

― Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet